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Iraq's relations with its Arab neighbors – in particular Egypt – were degraded by mounting violence in Iraq against expatriate groups, well-employed during the war, by Iraqi unemployed, among them demobilized soldiers.

These events drew little notice outside the Arab world because of fast-moving events directly related to the fall of Communism in Eastern Europe.

The coalition ceased its advance and declared a ceasefire 100 hours after the ground campaign started.

An array of nations joined the coalition, forming the largest military alliance since World War II.

The great majority of the coalition's military forces were from the US, with Saudi Arabia, the United Kingdom and Egypt as leading contributors, in that order.

Ostensibly, this was because of improvement in the regime's record, although former US Assistant Defense Secretary Noel Koch later stated: "No one had any doubts about [the Iraqis'] continued involvement in terrorism ...

The real reason was to help them succeed in the war against Iran." With Iraq's newfound success in the war, and the Iranian rebuff of a peace offer in July, arms sales to Iraq reached a record spike in 1982.

At the same time, Saddam looked for closer ties with those Arab states that had supported Iraq in the war.